Francks François Deceus

1. Blue Hat, acrylic on paper, 24x30, $4500, 2005
Blue Hat, acrylic on paper, 24×30, 2005 – SOLD
Harlem, acrylic on paper, 18x24, $2800, 2006
Harlem, acrylic on paper, 18×24, 2006
3. Morning Rush (study), acrylic on paper, 12x18, $2200, 2005
Morning Rush (study), acrylic on paper, 12×18, 2005
4. Opening Night (study) #2, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 12x18, $2200, 2005
Opening Night (study) #2, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 12×18, 2005 – SOLD
Opening Night (study) #3, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 12x18, $2200, 2005
Opening Night (study) #3, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 12×18, 2005
6. Opening Night (study), #1, acrylic on paper, 12x18, $2200, 2005
Opening Night (study), #1, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 12×18, 2005
7. Red Apple (study), acrylic on paper, 12x16, $3200, 2005
Red Apple (study), acrylic on paper, 12×16, 2005
8. Wall Street, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 16x20, $2200, 2006
Wall Street, silkscreen & acrylic on paper, 16×20, 2006
9. Relocating, (study #1), acrylic on paper, 12x18, $2500, 2005
Relocating, (study #1), acrylic on paper, 12×18, 2005 – SOLD

10. Afro, mixed media on wood (framed), 21x21, 2003, $4300
Afro, mixed media on wood, 21×21, 2003
11. Grand Ma’s Room II (Everyday People Series) (framed), 40x40, mixed-media on canvas, 2000, $8500
Grand Ma’s Room II, 40×40, mixed-media on canvas, 2000
12. Keeping Faith, mixed media on wood, 48x48, 2004, $7000 - deceus
Keeping Faith, mixed media on wood, 48×48, 2004 – SOLD
Busing #1, silkscreen & acrylic on canvas, 24x36, 2005, $5500
Busing #1, silkscreen & acrylic on canvas, 24×36, 2005
Monday Morning #1, silkscreen & acrylic on canvas, 24x36, 2005, $5800
Monday Morning #1, silkscreen & acrylic on canvas, 24×36, 2005
Francks François Deceus
Francks F. Deceus was born in Cap-Haitien, Haiti. He currently resides and maintains a studio in Brooklyn, NY. Deceus received a B.A. in Sociology from Long Island University, NY in 1992 and studied Printmaking at Atlantis Arts Atelier, Gentily, France in 2007.
As a Haitian immigrant or “refugee”, as I was sometimes referred to while growing up in Brooklyn during the 1980s, it was difficult to maintain explicit social and cultural ties to more than one place at a time. This created a constant struggle with identity and acceptance. This is why the time period following major social events, crises, upheavals, is particularly interesting to me; because at these crucial moments – those hours, days, weeks or months – we come together, regardless of ethnicity, gender, or class. We are able to respond to each other as human and nothing else. I have always been interested in events and issues that affect large groups of people simultaneously.
The work is austere and playful in equal measure. The large groupings suggest a particular tension and mystery, yet the figures retain their own individual identity within a complex social structure. The blue uniforms are deliberate in creating a landscape that serves as a metaphor, for our ability to arrest personal judgment, and develop true tolerance in anticipation of better.
Exhibitions
The Pounder-Kone Art Space, Los Angeles; Tilford Art Group, Los Angeles, CA; and the First World Art Gallery, Washington, D.C. Group exhibitions include the Brooklyn Museum, NY; Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Arts (MOCADA), Brooklyn, NY; The National Civil Rights Museum, Memphis TN; Gallery M, New York, NY; and Hampton University, Hampton, VA. The works of Deceus have entered numerous public collections, including Xavier University, New Orleans, LA and the Schomburg Center, New York Public Library, NY. His work has been featured in publications such as the International Revue of African-American Art and The Village Voice.

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