Sharon Louise Barnes

1. Again and Again

Naked Against the Elements, acrylic, resin, primed roofing paper, and conduit on wood, 19”, 2017

2. DE'Tente, A Negotiated Easing of A Hot Situation, 2016

DE’Tente, A Negotiated Easing of A Hot Situation, mixed media, acrylic, industrial paper, sculpture on bamboo, H26xW39xD6, 2016

3. Her Magic is Unwritten

Just Because We’re Magic, acrylic, enamel, epoxy, photo transfer on gauze, and found materials on canvas enclosed in plexiglass box, 18×18, 2017

4. Humming In The Night

Humming in the Night, suspended sculpture, industrial paper, guitar strings, acrylic, wire, rope, lacquer, 50Hx31W, 2017

5. I'll Rise Up

I’ll Rise Up, wall-mounted sculptures, industrial paper, acrylic, lacquer and enamel, 2017/2018

6. Just Because We're Magic

Her Magic Is Unwritten, acrylic, enamel, epoxy, photo transfer on gauze, and found materials on canvas enclosed in plexiglass box, 18×18, 2017

7. Naked Against the Elements

Naked Against the Elements, acrylic, resin, primed roofing paper, and conduit on wood, 19”, 2017

8. Nuances of Color - 1

The Nuances of Color (#1), wall-mounted sculptures, industrial paper, enamel and acrylic paint, wire-mounted on wood panel, 25×25, 2017/2018

9. Nuances of Color - 3

The Nuances of Color (#3), wall-mounted sculptures, industrial paper, enamel and acrylic paint, wire-mounted on wood panel, 25×25, 2017/2018

10. She Wove Constellations Through Her Dreadlocks

She Wove Constellations Through Her Dreadlocks, suspended sculpture, industrial paper, salvaged piano strings, harp strings, guitar strings, wire, rope, acrylic, lacquer, 76H and 27Diameter, 2017

11. The Debris That Floats

The Debris In Our Collective Stream of Consciousness, Wall mounted sculpture, roofing paper, acrylic, enamel, resin, and salvaged materials on mounted on wood panel, 2016

17. Intolerance of Difference hi res

The Intolerance of Difference, mixed media acrylic with industrial materials and found materials on joined canvases, 48×72, 2018

18. No One Said That What Was hi res

No One Said That What Was, Cannot Be Changed, mixed media acrylic with industrial materials and found materials on joined canvases, 48×72, 2018,

12. Urban Dream Catcher Series - #1 Creativity - DSC_1896

Urban Dream Catcher Series – #1 Creativity, mixed media, acrylic, African Turquoise and Jasper semiprecious stone, found and re-purposed objects on canvas, 2018

13. Urban Dream Catcher Series - #2 Positive Change - DSC_1896

Urban Dream Catcher Series – #2 Positive Change, mixed media, acrylic, African Turquoise and Jasper semi-precious stone, found and re-purposed objects on canvas, 2018

14. Urban Dream Catcher Series - #3 Healing and Balance - DSC_1896

Urban Dream Catcher Series – #3 Healing and Balance, mixed media, acrylic, African Turquoise and Jasper semi-precious stone, found and re-purposed objects on canvas, 2018

15. Viewpoints A Verite (triptych)

Viewpoints: A Verite’, acrylic, photo transfer and mixed media triptych on wood panels, 24×72, 2016 – SOLD

16. Winter In America

Winter In America (for Gil), Five wall mounted sculptures configured in a circle, roofing paper, plaster, wire, industrial primer, lacquer, enamel, 2018

 

Process and materials are essential elements of my art practice.  By working through the challenges presented by the use of rough and salvaged materials, while applying enough sustained will to transform them into works of art, my works signify hope, struggle, and transformation.

By using industrial materials that might normally be held in a laborer’s hands, as well as an array of discarded materials that can found on city streets, my abstract works are both conceptual and aesthetic. They look outward into society, opening dialogs about marginalization, about how we determine value, and the potency of change.  They also speak to my African American heritage where people built something from very little or nothing, and demonstrated the power to transform one’s condition through the exercise of will.

I have created either visual art or music my entire life. On this creative path, nothing has been more remarkable in my memory than when my fifth grade teacher gave me the tools of perspective drawing to create the illusion of reality, or when my African American Art History professor, renowned artist Dr. Samella Lewis, exposed me to the visual artists of the Black Arts Movement.  These instances truly changed my life because they brought me to understand both the sheer magic of art and its unrestrained power to communicate.

 

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